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The Deborah Harris Agency

THE MILLION THAT CHANGED THE MIDDLE EAST: Russian Immigration to Israel

THE MILLION THAT CHANGED THE MIDDLE EAST: Russian Immigration to Israel

By: GALILI, Lily & BRONFMAN, Roman

Nonfiction, 2013

The huge influx of Russian Jewry to Israel between 1989 and 2012 has had profound demographic, social and political effects on the State of Israel. Fateful decision on the crucial issues of war and peace, Israel’s security and its social and political policies were all dramatically influenced by this huge immigration. The impact has been felt far beyond Israel’s borders and has changed the whole of the Middle East. Lily Galili and Roman Bronfman have written the first in-depth history of this extraordinary migration. With a combination of trenchant analysis and compelling individual stories, THE MILLION THAT CHANGED THE MIDDLE EAST is a revealing and valuable exploration of one of the seminal events in modern Israeli history.

Rights Sold to:

Published by:

Israel, Matar

Reviews:

“[P]ath-breaking…one ought to be grateful for Galili and Bronfman’s valuable report on the present state of affairs [of Russian descendant Jewish immigrants to Israel]” – Walter Laqueur, Jewish Review of Books

“One of its clear-cut objectives is to shatter a few of the persistent myths and stereotypes that have been attached to this large group of new immigrants. It does so in a professional and balanced manner that does not spare the rod either from veteran Israeli society or the Russian population... The Million that Changed the Middle East is an in-depth and complex historical survey, succinct and readable. It looks from a broad perspective at processes that took place and are still taking place in a shifting Israeli society.” – Masha Zur Glozman, Ha’aretz

“Not only a depiction of an important process in the past decades of Israel's history, the book also is mirror onto Israeli society, with its flaws and strengths…[T]he Russian-speaking public… is both in it and outside of it, criticizing it but absorbed in it, stranger to it, but also an essential part of it.” – Makor Rishon